FinTech Connect Event in London

FinTech Connect Live
FinTech Connect Live

We recently partnered with FinTech Connect, a company that was launched with the vision of building a platform and community for the global FinTech industry.

As part of this partnership, there are discounted tickets available to their next event in London (6th & 7th December 2016) for our readership. If you’re interested in the FinTech industry and think this might be of interest then check out the event brochure here.

If you want to attend use the code FTCL1627 to get a 25% discount on your ticket. Just head over to https://register.iqpc.com/SRSPricing.aspx?eventid=1002786

Why we should be positive about the outlook for the UK Tech scene

UK Tech Scene - London Calling

I wanted to share some thoughts I read in a post on VentureBeat by Gerard Grech, the CEO of Tech City UK, a UK-based non-profit focused on accelerating the growth of the UK’s digital economy.

The post is titled, as blog posts tend to be, “9 things you didn’t know about the UK’s tech scene“, but really delivers an incisive analysis of why investors specifically (but by extension entrepreneurs) have reason to be sanguine about the tech sector in the UK (even post-Brexit).

You can read the full article (15min read) by following the link in the title above or by clicking here

If you haven’t got 15 minutes or so, I’ve listed three of the key points here:

1. The UK is the second biggest destination in the world for VC money, on a per capita basis ($3.6 billion was invested last year, up by 70 percent from the year before!)

2. The UK is second in the world for tech startup exits, after the US. There were 135 mergers and acquisitions in the most recent quarter of 2016.

3. The UK government helps tech companies from cradle to exit with the world’s most generous tax breaks and capital gains exemptions for investors as well as visa schemes for digital innovation experts and grants for entrepreneurs.

The cause is strong!

Angel Investment vs Venture Capital – Which would you choose?

VC's vs Angels
This morning I read a great post by Venture Spring. Venture Spring is a hugely well respected ‘venture development’ company which “helps Fortune 500 companies innovate like startups” according to their company mantra. The article is about the differences between venture capital funding and funding from angel investors.

Startups are often all too eager to take one option over the other based on their own preconceptions. It’s important to realise that one may be more suited to one type of startup over another (and vice versa. So, understanding the points of difference could be crucial to the way in which you approach your fundraise; and how your company ends up being run down the line. So it’ll be worth your while familiarising yourself with the key points…

You can read the full article on their site here. (It’s a 5-10 min read).

Or, I’ve summarised the key differences for you here and (added in a few that they missed!):

Angel Investors:
– are private individuals investing their own money
– can make quick decisions regarding investment
– can be flexible in the amount they invest
– can provide expertise, contacts and support as well as capital
– can feel personally attached to your business
– can be as hands-off or hands-on as you require
– can qualify for tax breaks like SEIS and EIS
– do not have to be given board positions

Venture Capital Firms:
– are whole companies that invest in startups
– are run by professional investors investing money from corporations, individuals, funds and foundations
– take board positions and have a strong say in how the company is managed and grown going forward
– invest much larger amounts than angel investors
– do not usually invest at seed stage
– generally invest not less than £1million
– take a longer time to make investment decisions and broker deals

What’s your take on the issue? Do you have any experiences you’d like to share? Comment below or hit me up on Twitter

Success Story: Data Science marketplace Pivigo secures investment following rapid growth

Pivigo (http://www.pivigo.com/), a data science marketplace and training provider based in London, has announced the successful closing of its funding round with investment secured from high profile consortia including Angel Academe, Craigie Capital, Dubai-based Dunamis Ventures Ltd and London Co-Investment Fund, the Mayor of London’s early stage business fund.

Angel Investment Network is delighted to have made a significant contribution to this success story through its introduction of Dunamis Ventures Ltd.

You can view the full press release on the Pivigo blog here

Now that they are fully funded, they are well placed “to reach a much larger audience, help connect more people with each other and work with companies to gain value from data…” as Founder and CEO, Kim Nilsson, puts it.

We can’t wait to see the progress they make!

“How to be an Angel Investor” by the founder of Y Combinator and the first SaaS company

Keep calm and be an angel investor

There’s a lot of dross on the internet. Too much of it. Too many people weighing in with half-baked, ill-founded opinions in an attempt to seem like an authority on whatever subject they’ve taken it upon themselves to spout about.

That said, the internet has gone a long way to help ‘democratise’ education; suddenly, people’s horizons have been opened up by the plethora of information available. If you’re bright and motivated, you no longer need a teacher, you can teach yourself with the web as your guide. You just have to be able to sift through garbage to find the gold.

Here I’ve attempted to do this for you. A lot of people like to offer their opinion on the subject of Angel Investing; a lot of people should be more considered. But every now and again it’s nice to get the view of a real authority with a track record in startups and in angel investing. Paul Graham started out as an entrepreneur, founding Viaweb (the first SaaS company) which was acquired by Yahoo in 1998 fora reported $49million. He then founded Y Combinator which has funded over 1000 startups since 2005, including Dropbox, Airbnb, Stripe, and Reddit.

In this essay, he offers his wisdom on how to be an Angel Investor which he describes as “mysterious and complicated” at first but “turns out to be easier than…expected, and also more interesting.”

Well worth a read! Here’s the link: How to be an Angel Investor by Paul Graham