Latest Success Story: Repairly get their investment fix

Repairly is one of the latest company’s to come off Angel Investment Network’s funding line. The company is now gunning to fix the technology repair industry having closed a £265,000 seed round.

Repairly is disrupting the billion-dollar technology repair services industry by offering collection and delivery on broken tech. Their mission is to make it ridiculously simple to get your phone, tablet or laptop repaired.

Repairly 3

The introduction of Repairly means that people no longer have to go to the expensive Apple Store or inconvenient corner shops – customers don’t even have to leave their desk. Repairly collect, repair and return within an average of 2 hours and 6 minutes.

Fraser Williams, co-founder and CEO at Repairly, says: “Over 32,000 phones get broken everyday in the UK alone. People don’t know where to turn when this happens. Repairly turns people’s negative experience into a positive one, and if you can find delight in a phone repair, you can find it anywhere.”

Richard Edwards, the other co-founder, says: “We ensure busy people with broken technology are back up and running as soon as possible…We saw how much technology had advanced but the support for that technology was lagging behind. People were waiting for up to 2 weeks without their phone. That seems crazy in today’s technology-reliant society.”

The business was started in 2015 after Fraser Williams dropped out of University. Richard Edwards was an early team member of the online cleaning marketplace, Hassle.com, which was acquired by Rocket Internet in July 2015.

Repairly is a graduate of the UK accelerator programme Virgin Media Techstars. The seed investment came from well-reputed investors including someone whose previous company, AddLive, was acquired by Snapchat, Richard Fearn, Daniel Murray (CEO, Grabble), Richard Pleeth (Ex-Google).

Richard Fearn comments: “Repairly’s business is growing quickly into a large market, with strong unit economics and great customer reviews.”

Exciting news for Repairly; and everyone prone to breaking their smartphone!

FinTech Connect Event in London

FinTech Connect Live
FinTech Connect Live

We recently partnered with FinTech Connect, a company that was launched with the vision of building a platform and community for the global FinTech industry.

As part of this partnership, there are discounted tickets available to their next event in London (6th & 7th December 2016) for our readership. If you’re interested in the FinTech industry and think this might be of interest then check out the event brochure here.

If you want to attend use the code FTCL1627 to get a 25% discount on your ticket. Just head over to https://register.iqpc.com/SRSPricing.aspx?eventid=1002786

Angel Investment vs Venture Capital – Which would you choose?

VC's vs Angels
This morning I read a great post by Venture Spring. Venture Spring is a hugely well respected ‘venture development’ company which “helps Fortune 500 companies innovate like startups” according to their company mantra. The article is about the differences between venture capital funding and funding from angel investors.

Startups are often all too eager to take one option over the other based on their own preconceptions. It’s important to realise that one may be more suited to one type of startup over another (and vice versa. So, understanding the points of difference could be crucial to the way in which you approach your fundraise; and how your company ends up being run down the line. So it’ll be worth your while familiarising yourself with the key points…

You can read the full article on their site here. (It’s a 5-10 min read).

Or, I’ve summarised the key differences for you here and (added in a few that they missed!):

Angel Investors:
– are private individuals investing their own money
– can make quick decisions regarding investment
– can be flexible in the amount they invest
– can provide expertise, contacts and support as well as capital
– can feel personally attached to your business
– can be as hands-off or hands-on as you require
– can qualify for tax breaks like SEIS and EIS
– do not have to be given board positions

Venture Capital Firms:
– are whole companies that invest in startups
– are run by professional investors investing money from corporations, individuals, funds and foundations
– take board positions and have a strong say in how the company is managed and grown going forward
– invest much larger amounts than angel investors
– do not usually invest at seed stage
– generally invest not less than £1million
– take a longer time to make investment decisions and broker deals

What’s your take on the issue? Do you have any experiences you’d like to share? Comment below or hit me up on Twitter

Calling all UK angels to help with a quick survey

Hi everyone,

We’re helping out with a research study on angel groups in the UK.

The study is being conducted by Tiago Botelho and Prof Colin Mason from the University of Glasgow’s Adam Smith Business School, and should allow us to see how our members see syndication in general and how we can improve our network.

We’d be really grateful if any UK angel investors could take the time to complete the survey (it is completely anonymous and should take around 10 minutes).

Here is the link for the survey, which will be open until the end of June:  https://qtrial2014.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_ehryzeOsCGAS4hT

Also, it would be great if you could share this link with any other UK angels that you know.

Barbara Corcoran’s Angel Investor Checklist

Shark Tank star and angel investor shares the hard-hitting questions she asks entrepreneurs before investing in their business.

Jeff Clavier on how to be an Angel Investor

Leena Rao interviews SoftTech VC Jeff Clavier about the way he became an angel investor and how to become one yourself at Disrupt SF 2011 day three.

We’d love to see you at our next Pitching Event

Top 5 US Angel Investors Over the Last Year

Angel investors have been playing a pivotal role in the American economy for almost half a century, particularly in shaping up the technology industry. Silicon Valley, for instance, has been built and developed by and on the foundations laid by many angel investors. All major tech giants today were start-ups at one point in time.

This infographic shows the Top 5 US Angel Investors of 2013.  Between them, they have invested in more than 700 start-ups so far, out of which more than 150 were in 2013 alone.

Top-5-US-Angel-Investors-Over-the-Last-Year-min-2

2013 Halo Report: US Angel Investment Year in Review

CB Insights, in conjunction with Silicon Valley Bank and the Angel Resource Institute, recently released the 2013 year-end Halo Report. The full 27-page angel investing report includes breakdowns by industry and geography as well as valuation trends. In addition, the report includes a ranked list of the top 10 most active angel groups in 2013.

To download the entire 27-page 2013 year-end Halo Report, login here. The underlying angel investment data is also available and proprietary to CB Insights. (note: the report is available to anyone with a free CB Insights login)

Highlights of the 2013 year-end Halo Report include:

  • Syndicated Deals Produce Larger Investment Rounds.  Overall median deal size in 2013 was $600k, but when angels co-invested alongside other types of firms (including VCs, etc.) that median shot up to $1.7M.
  • High Valuation Deals on the Rise.  While 2013 median angel deal valuations held consistent with last year at $2.5M, the top quartile of angel deals carried valuations of $4.2M or greater. This represents a stronger showing at the top versus 2012.
  • Golden Seeds is #1.  Golden Seeds topped the leader board for most deals completed in 2013 – up from 5th place in 2012. Meanwhile the 2012 winner, New York Angels, fell to the 7th spot in 2013.

A bit of a laugh for everyone…