Dave McQueen’s 3 Tips for the Perfect Elevator Pitch

Angel investor Dave McQueen give his top 3 tips on how to deliver a perfect elevator pitch.


Here are the essential do’s and don’ts for a startup pitch

Nathan Gold, founder of The Demo Coach, and Scott Case, co-Founder and CEO of Startup America Partnership, discuss a wide range of pitch do’s and don’ts. Watch as they provide live feedback on pitches from several startups.


8 Simple Steps to an Awesome Business Plan or Investor Pitch


Infographic – Make Your Million-Dollar Idea


Learn 7 crucial steps to create your rock-solid business plan and head for startup success


Infographic – How Do I Build a Business Plan?

You have a powerful idea for the next big thing, but before you sell it to anyone, you have to get it all down on paper. It’s time to make a business plan. How do you know if you’re headed in the right direction? Washington State University created an infographic that provides 10 guidelines to help prospective entrepreneurs organize their thoughts and wow potential investors.

What’s your Number 1 business plan tip?


Infographic – Investor Pitch Archetypes

Investor Pitch Archetypes

Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.


Full presentation: Top 10 Investor Pitch FAILS from SpringBeta!

Kraettli Epperson talks about some of the bad pitches companies make to investors at the spring beta 2013 conference.


Infographic – Inside the Investor’s Mind

Jeff Clavier walks through his thinking when a startup pitches him for funding.


Selling Investors the Problem and the Solution

The most important thing when writing a business plan or pitching to angels is selling the problem your solution solves. Nobody is going to buy a solution for a problem they don’t have, which obviously means you don’t have a viable business.

I recently saw an entrepreneur pitching for funding, and it had all the right ingredients – a slick pitch, a good PowerPoint presentation and a nice-looking website. All very impressive, except for one thing… Her business solved a problem that didn’t exist. By the end of the evening, I think even she had realised that she was onto a loser.

The pitches that get the investors most excited offer a solution to a problem they have or a problem someone they know has. An avid golfer, for example, will get very excited about a new golfing invention. Or, if an investor is listening to you thinking “My mate Bob was complaining about this last week, and I think this guy’s onto something”, you’ve got them hooked.

The best businesses evolve from an entrepreneur who finds a problem in their life or business and figures out a product or service that fixes this problem for others. However, before you spend your valuable time and money figuring out the solution, you need to find out whether:

1) Other people have the same problem you do;

2) Enough people have the problem to make a successful business.

After selling them the problem, you then need to give a quick and compelling description of the solution. Time is limited and you don’t want to bore the investors, so don’t get bogged down in the technology and technical details behind your solution. Try to keep it as simple and concise as possible and explain what your solution is and what makes it better than the competition. Is it faster, cheaper, more eco-friendly? If the investors want to know more about what makes it is faster and how you can make it cheaper, they’ll ask later.

Your pitch is meant to give an introduction or overview and a pitch – and a short one at that – to capture the attention of a potential investor. If you manage to sell them the problem and then convince them you have a valid solution, you should have them hooked.  Then you’ll have their attention for the rest of your pitch, and hopefully you’ll manage to get some business cards and line up some meetings.